Thursday, February 27, 2014

Bobcat or Bust

By Nicole Thibodeaux

SAN MARCOS- People are rushing to enroll at Texas State University making enrollment for the Fall 2013 semester a record high for the 16th consecutive year with 35,568 students and a more diverse student population than ever before.

“This new high in student enrollment demonstrates that Texas State continues to be a leading university in the state," President Denise Trauth said. "Students and their families recognize our institution offers both an outstanding educational experience as well as an exceptional value.”

Most students can see the changes and the overall quality at Texas State University improving.

"Things are changing and we are no longer quite the party school that Texas State has been known for since it was Southwest Texas," said Colby Gober.

Gober and many students went on to say that they are happy with the new rush of students and diversity that has flocked to Texas State. 

“As the demographics of Texas continue to shift, it is important that our institutions of higher learning adequately reflect the growing diversity of this state," Texas State Provost Eugene Bourgeois said.

According to a press release from University News Service minorities now make up 42 percent of the student population with Hispanics making up 30 percent and African Americans making up eight percent. These numbers have all improved from previous years.

While most students are happy with the increase of Bobcats, others seem to be slightly weary.

"Class sizes are going to increase dramatically and get out of hand," Chelsey Kidder said.

Kidder, as well as, many other students also expressed that the university needs to address the lack of parking and better school provided transportation.

“I live in the Heights 2 so the buses are always crowded because we are one of the last stops on my bus route,” said Tyler Stevenson. 

Busses and stops have already been added in the last year but with the increase of apartment complexes and possible parking lots there will surely need to be adjustments to the routes.

"Driving around the town, you can’t help but notice the amount of traffic and finding parking on or near campus is practically impossible," said Clint Krehmeier.

 
The resounding message from the student body, however, has been upbeat and positive. 

"I really enjoy it here. It is one of the best decisions I have ever made," said Lilly Woldehawariat.

Even with the possible stress of parking next year there is an overwhelming sense of Texas State pride that courses through even freshmen's veins. With all of the things happening around campus it will be hard for these incoming Bobcat cubs to not feel the same.


Growth at Texas State Evokes Various Emotions


Alexis Oliver

 

 

Texas State University announced its record-breaking enrollment of 35,568 students for the fall 2013 semester, making it Texas State’s 16th consecutive year for increasing enrollment.

 

The student population has grown by 1,343 students since 2012.


“Of those, a large number of freshmen from the top ten percent of their graduating class were among this group than in previous years,” University President Denise M. Trauth said in the press release published in September 2013. “This new high in student enrollment demonstrates that Texas State continues to be a leading university in the state, and that students and their families recognize our institution offers both an outstanding educational experience as well as an exceptional value,” said Trauth.

 

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ZNHLxrUElGE/Uw0KeG3w7TI/AAAAAAAAAgY/IdLEmN_zQhU/s1600/IMG_20140217_172855_680.jpgAlthough President Trauth is pleased with the increasing population, the growing number of students has caused various problems for Bobcats both on and off Texas State campus.

 

"Construction is so frustrating because it seems like it's always going on," environmental studies major Mason Randolph said.

 

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-HfKB4zVivBY/Uw_455Q_-cI/AAAAAAAAABg/aZ8znjawP5s/s1600/IMG_7949.jpgTransfer student Shanna Bradford agreed that the crowded streets will become a bigger problem if the proper steps are not taken.  “If it continues to grow at that rate there definitely needs to be expansion plans already in place so there's not that congestion problem with traffic," she said.

 

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-zP62yI6414Q/Uw_5KUfCkAI/AAAAAAAAABo/S6g6BEHYTv8/s1600/photo.JPGIt seems as if parking has been a complaint for many students in past years but only continues to worsen. Shortages in parking spots have spread from campus to around San Marcos in general.

 

“Now the streets are packed all the time, a ridiculous amount of traffic. I can’t ever find a parking spot at HEB,” said senior Kelsey Kotzur.



http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-B6pFi9_wEeI/Uw0Kfh_ThwI/AAAAAAAAAgw/SFlReE_EkUw/s1600/pic.jpg

On the other hand, students like dance and business major Brigitte Menard do not mind the growing student body. “I like that there is people everywhere. People hanging out at the river, at the square, and around campus,” she said. “Hopefully more students mean more privileges like better options for food, buses, and things like that.”

 

 

19-year-old Victoria Herrera also chose to focus on the positives like Texas State’s diverse student population increasing.

 

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-uPU25UHD9ik/Uw-C1iXgXNI/AAAAAAAAAFg/KFBu727z2AA/s1600/victoria.JPG"It's a good thing because I'm one of those people,” she said. “It gives you a chance to meet people from all walks of life."

 

 

Regardless of the various attitudes towards the consistent growth, it proves to be inevitable that Texas State University student body will continue to grow in the coming years. As long as San Marcos officials make proper adjustments, Texas State’s future is bright.

Texas State Breaks Enrollment Records-by: Katie McLendon

SAN MARCOS--Texas State University announced its record-breaking enrollment for the 2013 fall semester, a staggering 35,568 students, marking Texas State’s 16th consecutive year for breaking enrollment records.

Over the past sixteen years, Texas State has continually given more students the opportunity to an education, a duty Denise M. Trauth, President of Texas State University does not take lightly.

“We take our role in preparing the next-generation work force in Texas very seriously, so it is gratifying to see that so many incoming students are choosing to attend Texas State,” she said.

In a recent press release, not only has Texas State’s enrollment increased by 1,343 students from the 2012 enrollment year, it’s also the most diverse student body in the university’s history.

Texas State’s increased enrollment has created some positive and negative views with some of the university’s students. Some students said the campus is unable to accommodate its increased amount of students, and until the campus constructs more parking, the enrollment should no longer increase.

Mason Randolph, an environmental studies senior, said that while it is Texas State’s incentive to make profit and accept as many students as possible, it would be beneficial to cap the amount of students who get accepted each year.

“They should set a goal, like 3,500 students and then try to accommodate those students, like making more parking and stuff rather than just building more dorms,” he said.

Parking seems to be an major issue among students. The construction on campus seems to be a never-ending ordeal. Sydney Affilitto, an early education student says that even though the current construction on campus is a pain, in the long run it will be worth it. “In order to create more parking, there has to be construction,” she said.

Mitch Quintanilla, a music major, says parking has always been an issue, even when he began his college education in 2006. “If they do continue to grow the university needs…a few more parking garages,” he said.

Not all students see this increased enrollment in students as a negative issue. Brigitte Menard, a dance and business major, said she looked forward to attending Texas State so she could receive a real college experience.

“I like that there is people everywhere. People hanging out at the river, at the square, and around campus,” she said. “Hopefully more students means more privileges like better options for food, buses, and things like that.”

Frankie DiMento, a political science and philosophy senior, said education is something that Texas State should give to as many students as possible.

“Education is a great thing so increased enrollment just means more people getting a good education,” he said.

Trauth said the increased student enrollment shows that Texas State continues to be a top university in the state. Texas State has a duty to not only give students a great education, but a great experience as well.

“Students and their families recognize our institution offers both an outstanding experience as well as an exceptional value.”





Basic Story 3 By Ricardo Barge


Texas State University announced that it marks its 16th consecutive year that student enrollment has increased from the previous year.

 Texas State University has a record-setting enrollment of 35,568 students for the 2013 fall semester; this is an increase from 34,225 students that attended the 2012 fall semester. Ashley Jeffries, music major at Texas State University, says this is in part due to “especially since we have the biggest freshman class this year." With the increase of students, the impact it has is positive and negative. Prestige for the university increases with the enrollment increase, but what about the space available for those students to park?

Parking at Texas State University has always been a problem according to 25-year-old music major, Mitch Quintanilla.

“I started in 2006 and left for a few years. Parking has always sucked,” he said.

With parking being a problem over the years, the overall growth of the university will increase that problem, unless the proper plans are in place to accommodate with the growth. Transfer student from San Antonio Shanna Bradford who has only been here one semester even understands that.

“If it continues to grow at that rate there definitely need to be expansion plans already in place so there's not that congestion problem with traffic," she said.

With the increase of enrollment there is also an effect to the parking at local establishments outside of campus. Senior Kelsey Kotzur notices the parking shortage around town.

“Now the streets are packed all the time, a ridiculous amount of traffic. I can’t ever find a parking spot at HEB,” she said.

 With the planning for more parking comes construction of parking garages. San Marcos already has construction happening all over town due to population increase, which increases traffic all around town. Texas State University student Sydney Afflitto lives with the traffic every day, but believes parking garages still need to be built.

“I mean it's a pain, especially with driving and stuff, but I think that parking is definitely an issue. In order to create more parking, there has to be construction,” she said.

16th year of record-setting enrollment at Texas State University




                For the 16th year in a row Texas State University has had record-setting enrollment, reaching 35,568 students in the 2013 fall semester.
The student population grew by 1,343 students since 2012 and Texas State officials report that the student body as a whole is the most diverse it has been since the University first opened in 1899. Undergraduate enrollment has increased by 1,574 students, including 5,181 freshmen alone.
“Of those, a large number of freshmen from the top ten percent of their graduating class were among this group than in previous years,” University President Denise M. Trauth said in the press release. The press release from September of 2013 showed that 49% of the incoming freshmen were of the top 25 percentile of their High school senior class.
“This new high in student enrollment demonstrates that Texas State continues to be a leading university in the state, and that students and their families recognize our institution offers both an outstanding educational experience as well as an exceptional value,” said Trauth.
Official reports state that minority attendance at the University makes up 45% of the student body. The Hispanic population makes up 30% of the student body alone since increasing by twelve percent, and African American enrollment has increased by fourteen percent.
“As the demographics of Texas shift, it is important that our institutions of higher learning adequately reflect the growing diversity of this state, so we are most pleased that our efforts to recruit students from all backgrounds has led to a truly diverse population at Texas State, “ said Eugene Bourgeois, the University Provost, as he reflected on the Universities growth in diversity.
For many students the rapid growth in enrollment and diversity at the university is seen as a positive aspect, and for many students was even a deciding factor in enrolling at Texas State.
Texas State is becoming more popular and definitely played in one of the reasons why I choose it over the other universities that I was looking into," said Sydney Afflitto, an education major at Texas State.
Sydney Afflitto

Students also see the mass diversification of Texas State as beneficial to their social lives, helping them be more open and receptive by exposing them to a wide variety of different people.
"It's a good thing because I'm one of those people. I started last semester. It gives you a chance to meet people from all walks of life," said Victoria Herrera, a 19-year-old freshman and marketing major at the university.
Victoria Herrera

However, though many students are excited to see the university continue to grow, others feel as though it is growing too fast and claim to be negatively affected by the circumstances. With rapid growth comes construction, traffic, and class schedule conflict, all which students campus-wide are claiming to be negatively affected by. To accommodate the growth of the university the city of San Marcos had begun constructing new student housing locations and widening roads, and this city-wide remodeling has been taking a tole on many students.
"Well, people have complained about traffic and I will agree there’s a lot of cars on the road. Construction is so frustrating cause it seems like it's always going on," said Mason Randolph, an environmental studies senior.
Mason Randolph

Parking seems to also be a significant issue to most students who say it affects their schedule and convenience daily.
"It's become more difficult to find parking. Very crowded especially since we have the biggest freshman class this year," said Ashley Jeffries, a 19-year-old freshman studying music education. 
Ashley Jeffries

Though there are many mixed feelings and perspectives towards the growth in enrollment and diversity at Texas State, it is clear that the growth is a sign of success in the university. It shows that as an educational institution Texas State embodies an exemplary educational experience to it’s students and thus continues to recruit more and more students each year.


Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Students see issues with Texas State enrollment increase


Texas State University set an enrollment record of 35,568 students last fall semester, according to a Texas State press release. This is the 16th consecutive year that the student enrollment has increased.

President Denise M. Trauth is pleased with the increasing amounts of enrollment.

“This new high in student enrollment demonstrates that Texas State continues to be a leading university in the state, and that students and their families recognize our institution offers both an outstanding educational experience as well as an exceptional value,” she said.

Though the president is happy, the students see some issues that are results of the enrollment increase.

Annat Rosenthal, a student at Texas State feels the university is not physically capable to handle housing more students.


"(The university) should expand physically, like adding more dorms and room before more students,"said Rosenthal.

Another student, dance major Mayson Hornsby, agrees that the university is running out of space.
  
“The university is pushing its maximum limit, until it grows and adds more facilities like dining halls and dorms," said Hornsby

Hornsby also thinks that not only does the university need to grow, but also the entire city of San Marcos in order to accommodate the amount of students filling the area.
  
“We have enough trouble as it is, waiting for buses or trying to get places because some places are only one lane,” she said. 

Kelsey Kotzur, a senior at the university, also thinks the city of San Marcos can’t handle the increase of students. She thinks the university shouldn’t continue to grow until the city can hold an increase of students.

“The streets are packed all the time, a ridiculous amount of traffic. I can’t ever find a parking spot at H-E-B,” said Kotzur.

Though students see over-crowding at the university and in San Marcos, most agree that if the university increases physically, they would like to see the enrollment continue to increase.

"Education is a great thing so increased enrollment just means more people getting a good education," said Frankie DiMento, a senior at Texas State.

Ashley Jeffries agrees that Texas State enrollment should increase as long as the campus also grows.

    
“It makes our school more reputable."